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Review - Boston Globe (03.12.2009)

Fleetwood Mac has always thrived on, for better or worse, the dynamic among its members, and that tension was a vital part of the show's ebb and flow. Introducing "I Know I'm Not Wrong," Buckingham said the band has had "a complex and convoluted emotional history."

Case in point: After singing "Sara," Stevie Nicks sauntered over to Buckingham's microphone, peered into his eyes, and sang the last verse directly to him. Even though the song is more about Nicks's relationship at the time with Mick Fleetwood, Buckingham collapsed his head on her shoulder. Scripted or not, it was the evening's most poignant highlight. "We didn't rehearse that one," Buckingham said afterward, looking a bit flushed.

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Review - Campus Circle (2003)

The cover of the new Say You Will has Lindsey Buckingham and Stevie Nicks lying prostrate, facing opposite directions with feet spilling off the top and bottom of the shot, in a visual nod to the iconic final image of Masahiro Shinoda’s Double Suicide. Does it seem pretentious for a band whose biggest radio hit is still the sunny "Don’t Stop Thinking About Tomorrow" to draw parallels to the doomed lovers in a classic of Japanese cinema? It shouldn’t because no pop act exemplifies the rock-band-as-suicide-pact so perfectly as Fleetwood Mac. Buckingham and Nicks must glance across the stage at each other night after night, thinking over their years as lovers, as enemies and as mutually-indifferent playthings of fate, and pondering, with alternate bemusement and fury, the full and terrifying implications of the phrase "till death do us part."

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Review - uncommonmusic.org (11.04.2006)

Though it was a Lindsey Buckingham solo show, there were the requisite number of blonde haired women in platform boots and as much black chiffon as they could rustle up for the show.

Though Stevie was not visibly present, her mother, Barbara Nicks was in the audience for about half of the show.

Instead of entering the stage from the front, as many of the artists who play the Celebrity do, Lindsey came around from the back. He went right into NOT TOO LATE and then someone wished him a belated happy birthday before he got into TROUBLE.

He said, “This town has a lot of connections, all the way back to when I was a boy and we’d stay at the Camelback Inn, back when Scottsdale was a one-horse town. I spend a good deal of time here, in my memories and in the present. Stevie’s mom is here tonight, this is dedicated to her.” Stevie’s mom grinned and he played NEVER GOING BACK AGAIN.

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Review - GJ Sentinel (09.25.2008)

"Did You Miss Me" is a very catchy melancholy pop-rock song that may be an ode to his former love, Stevie Nicks, or it could be for his wife of many years, Kristen. Either way it would be an instant classic if it was on any Fleetwood Mac album and would have fit really well on "Rumours."


"Love Runs Deeper" is a classic Lindsey-era Fleetwood Mac rocker with terrific lead guitar work and, not so coincidentally Mick Fleetwood and John McVie on drums and bass, respectively.

If this song is not about Stevie Nicks then explain these lyrics to me, "I loved you little child, how you mystified," and "Black Angel can't be alone."

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Review - Perth Now (12.12.2009)

In introducing Gypsy, Nicks spoke of her early days jamming with Buckingham in San Francisco in the late 60s and early 70s. She spoke of opening for Janis Joplin in front of 35,000 people and Jimi Hendrix in front of 70,000 and how Buckingham's constant guitar playing "drove the gated community crazy". 

Prior to the brilliant Second Hand News Buckingham responded to a punter's call of "I love you Stevie" by confessing: "We all love Stevie".

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Review - Washington Post (05.11.2003)

Nicks acknowledged the irony that time has given to some of her vintage lyrics. During the evergreen "Landslide," perhaps the most covered tune in the Fleetwood Mac canon, Nicks nodded her head as the crowd cheered after she sang, "Even children get older / and I'm getting older too." And while she sang with former lover Buckingham on his fabulously bitter capsule of their breakup, "Go Your Own Way," both briefly guffawed while singing the line, "Shacking up is all you wanna do."

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Review - Boston Globe (06.13.1998)

And she also got in a funny dig on Fleetwood Mac mainstay/former lover, the more uptight, Lindsey Buckingham. "If I did this with Fleetwood Mac," she said after some improvised chat, "Lindsey would come over and say, `What are you doing?"' Not to worry, because last night Nicks was doing just fine.

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Review - Rock Magazine (12.11.1974)

It serves as a constant source of amazement in the way a supposedly first-class record company can go through all the trouble and expense of (A) "discovering" a new artist, (B) signing him, her, or them to a contract, (C) depositing the signee in a recording studio, (D) mixing the tapes, (E) pressing and packaging the discs, (F) releasing the finished "product"-and then, in the end, do absolutely nothing to inform the record-buying public of the performer's existence-let alone the existence of his, her (or their) debut album.

It's rather like trying to sell a house without letting anyone know it's up for sale. Within the entertainment industry, record companies seem to be outstandingly adept at this peculiar perversion. In contrast, film producers, for example, often spare no expense in promoting their newest releases-pouring astounding amounts of money and efforts into publicity-TV and radio spots, bus and subway posters, newspaper advertising, etc., etc., etc. Now, this is even true with films created by unknown directors (and featuring unknown actors and actresses). Of course, not every release gets a full page ad in the New York Times-but it's a rare film that passes into oblivion without some form of mass promotion.

Record companies? Well, if you've somehow managed to become an "established" star, there's really no need to worry about promotion. If you're a newcomer, you might miraculously find yourself singled out as the company's newest hope-in which case the hype will either make or break you. The grim reality of it all, however, is that you'll probably be another one of those faceless hopefuls who'll never get beyond that first album. Yes, the company will send out copies of your masterpiece (PROMOTIONAL COPY-NOT FOR SALE), but they'll almost invariably wind up buried (and unheard) beneath the carcasses of all the other PROMOTIONAL COPY-NOT FOR SALE's that other companies send to radio stations (and writers for publications such as this one). That's about it, too--no full-page ads in the rock press, no 30-second commercial spots on Midnight Special, no billboards along Sunset Strip. Unless some magical twist of fate brings a large dose of good fortune, you and your album (as far as the general public is concerned) might just as well not exist. If the market wasn't already cluttered with so many no-talent "artistes", your album might have had a fighting chance-and garnered some of that all-important publicity. Unfortunately, the market is shamefully over-saturated. With all this in mind, we turn (at last) to Buckingham Nicks.

No, of course you've never heard of them. Thanks to their record company, few people have. The fact of the matter is, however, that Buckingham Nicks have created what may well be one of the finest American albums released over the last three or four years.

A bit of an overstatement? Perhaps-to some peoples' ears, anyway. But in an industry which has become appallingly dominated by mindless bopping, Buckingham Nicks are a welcome change of pace. They are two people-Lindsey Buckingham and his lady, Stevi (nee Stephanie) Nicks, who were once members of a now-extinct San Francisco-based band called Fritz. Basically, their sound vaguely stems from the Los Angeles/1966 School of Music (Byrds et al). While they aren't blatantly imitating that style, the melodic and rhythmic structuring, the harmonies, and the overall atmospherics are very reminiscent of that era.

If one word had to be used to describe the album, soaring would be the obvious choice. Lindsey's shimmering guitar work, the stunning vocal harmonies, and the extremely tight and inventive rhythmic patterns exude a feeling of airiness-of flowing and syncopated movement. The songs themselves are often haunting, creating an "alive" yet foreboding atmosphere-like the electric stillness before a really good thunderstorm.

"Crying in the Night" is the obvious choice for that all-important hit single. A gently swaying, yet powerful track, it focuses on Stevi's distinctive, slightly urgent voice-accented by the faint shadow of an electric 12-string buried at the bottom of the mix. "Crystal" is strangely ominous-caught somewhere between a waltz and a funeral dirge, by way of Richard Halligan's starkly effective orchestral arrangement. The feeling is echoed in "Frozen Love"-an epic track featuring some of Stevi and Lindsey's most striking vocal work. "Don't Let Me Down Again" moves off in the opposite direction-with a simple, yet effectively strong melodic and rhythmic line. The vocals paint a vivid Slick/Balin-wailing-at-each-other-from-opposite-ends-of-the-stage panorama-and the whole thing works.

Keith Olsen produced and engineered the album-and it's enough to make one wish that every recording session had someone as good as he manning the board. Most of all, though, it's Lindsey and Stevi (with a bit of help from some session musician friends) who make it work-and they really are worth hearing. With a bit of luck, a few influential radio stations will pick up on them and, maybe then (no thanks to Polydor), people will discover exactly who Buckingham Nicks are. After that, who knows? There might even be a second album.

You never can tell.

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Review - Associated Content (06.16.2005)

The Buckingham Nicks chemistry is still palpable and full of the explosive are they going to kiss or kill each other syndrome. For awhile, the recording process goes along smoothly and everyone is on their best behavior. Stevie has brought some new songs in for the band to listen to and Lindsey, in a departure from his usual critical tone, is quick to offer praise. The day ends successfully with lots of (gulp) hugging! But then again, Nicks did specifically choose to place a spirit catcher in the studio to chase out bad vibes. She may not really be a witch, as often reported, but she probably is psychic because it doesn’t take long for the trouble to begin.


And then, there is the subject matter of the songs themselves. True to Fleetwood Mac form, there are songs about Lindsey written by Stevie and songs about Stevie written by Lindsey. After 30 years, one would think dealing with a long lost love affair would be old hat, but not for these two. When Nicks has some solo face time in front of the camera, she admits that one of her new songs “Thrown Down” is about Lindsey. You get the feeling that writing songs about him is a habit she would like to break. But old habits do die hard and she spends plenty of time gazing wistfully in her old lover’s direction as they work on songs together. Buckingham, though settled with the a decades younger trophy wife and two little children, obviously still carries a torch of his own. He gets teary eyed on one occasion as he tries to express to Nicks how much their working together again means to him and the album’s most poignant love song, “Say Goodbye” is more a love letter than a Dear Jane letter from him to Stevie.


Another volatile issue for the classic rock foursome arises just when we thought they were out of the woods. The songs have been recorded. It’s a single album, but with 18 tracks! Now, who do we get to mix the thing? Of course, Lindsey wants to use his guy and Stevie wants to use her guy. After some bickering (like an old married couple), they compromise by having Stevie work with Lindsey’s guy to see if she will be comfortable with him working on her music. She is, but then she isn’t. 

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Review - Patriot-News (06.14.2004)

Buckingham and Nicks dismissed the rest of the band for a sublime "Landslide," which she still does better than anyone. During his solo, she stepped behind him and placed her gloved hands on his shoulders, lightly tapping her fingers to the beat. The depth of their shared feelings blazed forth fully on Buckingham's wonderfully delicate "Say Goodbye" from the new album, a song about severed ties sung directly to each other. "Once you said goodbye to me," he whispered to her, "now I say goodbye to you." It was a heartbreaking moment that some in the too-noisy crowd missed. 

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Review - The News & Observer (05.24.2004)

"Most people know by now that our story has been a difficult and strange one," Buckingham said early on. "But the point is, here we are now."

Indeed, the dynamic between Buckingham and band mate/ex-lover Nicks dominated long stretches of the evening and made for some of its most moving interludes. "Sara" was lovely, with the video screens showing footage of Fleetwood Mac from 25 years ago. "Tusk" was peculiar, as Buckingham and Nicks pretended to box and eventually hugged instead. And "Landslide" was almost too emotional, just Nicks singing and Buckingham playing. As Buckingham picked out the song's solo on an acoustic guitar, Nicks stood behind him with her hands lightly on his shoulders. They clasped hands at the end and he gave her a chaste kiss on the head.

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Review - madison.com (05.10.2004)

At least two were wildly out of tune, which brought Saturday's virtually sold-out show sputtering to a halt a couple of times during the three-hour show. And, oddly enough, the mishaps only made the members of Fleetwood Mac even more down to earth and likable, as Buckingham did push-ups and sit-ups on the stage while waiting. Vocalist Stevie Nicks (or "Stephanie Nicks," as band co-founder/drummer Mick Fleetwood said) chatted with the audience, recalling that such glitches were nothing new.

"Many times in 1968, we would go on stages where nothing worked," Nicks told the audience. "And look where we are today."


Nicks and Buckingham, who are ex-lovers, show each other more affection onstage than most husband-and-wife musical duos, with hugs, hand-holding and smiles aplenty.

You got the sense that the band was as happy to be standing next to each other as the audience was to be sitting in front of them. 

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Review - Winconsin State Journal (05.09.2004)

Almost as much as the music, the audience seemed excited by the lingering chemistry between the former lovers Nicks and Buckingham. The pair might not appreciate it, but the audience cooed and applauded every time the two of them touched one another. What baby boomer, after all, doesn't harbor at least a slight fantasy of being onstage, still looking great, and spilling your guts to your long-lost first love as you two harmonize?

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Review - Uncut Magazine (March 2004)

Fleetwood Mac have the strangest effect on the least likely people. They're MOR with edge. Lindsey Buckingham and Stevie Nicks, who turned the drama of their disintegrating relationship into one of the best-selling albums ever made (1977's Rumours), are that edge. They flaunt it tonight. Buckingham and Nicks, the Meg and Jack White of dreamy, druggy '70s adult soft rock, act like this is the epilogue to the longest-running soap opera in rock'n'roll. He kisses her hand. They hug. They slow dance. They sing "Say Goodbye", one of the two valedictory ballads that climax the recent Say You Will comeback set, not to the crowd but to each other as if to apologise, right there, in front of several thousand forty-somethings in sensible knitwear, for hurting each other in the name of love. Then - and Uncut nuts you not - during faster number "What's The World Coming To" Stevie plays the bull to Lindsey's matador and, hunched forward, charges across the stage at his invisible cape with her index fingers poking above her head as horns. There is no weirder group in mainstream rock.

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Review - Manchester Online (12.04.2003)

AS Lindsey Buckingham played his guitar solo on Say You Will - a new Fleetwood Mac song pretty much like the old ones - Stevie Nicks sidled over and rested her forehead against his, nose-to-nose.

When Buckingham picked at his acoustic guitar during Landslide, Nicks stood behind her old lover and hugged his shoulders. 

And to the thundering soundtrack of Tusk, the pair squared up to each other like cartoon boxers, then fell into each other's arms and danced in the old-fashioned way - a neat metaphor for the last 25 years of their lives.

If Fleetwood Mac's pinnacle - the Rumours album of 1977 - was about break-ups and love gone wrong, today's incarnation (the Rumours line-up minus Christine McVie) is about friendship and looking back without anger.

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Review - dotmusic.com (December 2003)

Hats must also be tipped to Buckingham's unexpectedly brilliant solo rendition of 'Big Love' and for recapturing, how shall we say, the crazed wiredness of 'Tusk' which ended with him shadow boxing his former lover Nicks. Tongues were sent wagging with the pair strolling across the stage hand in hand and singing 'Landslide's sweet harmonies lost in each others eyes. Ah, bless them. They probably just got caught up in the moment.

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Review - The Independent (11.24.2003)

About half-way through the set, there's a two-song acoustic slot, with Nicks and the guitarist Lindsay Buckingham performing "Landslide" and "I'll Say Goodbye to You" as a duo. This is the perfect opportunity for them to tweak the audience's nostalgia for their long-since-finished love-affair. In reality, Buckingham once slapped Nicks and bent her backwards over the bonnet of his car, but tonight they are more Mills & Boon than Bonnie and Clyde.

"I know that somewhere in the past 25 years of your life you have heard this song," says Nicks of "Landslide". At the song's close, Buckingham puts his arm around Nicks and kisses her hair, then the arena's video-screens zoom in on their linked hands. "Are they back together, or what?" wonders a punter behind me. They aren't, of course, but in this, rock's longest-running soap opera, the "will they/won't they?" debate that Nicks and Buckingham astutely propagate is the equivalent of the dangling plotline that closes every episode of EastEnders.

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Review - The Independent (11.23.2003)

At 54, Stevie's sometime old man, Buckingham, is still too handsome for his own good, and a phenomenally good guitarist. Taking "Big Love" solo, he shows off his high-speed fingers in true Deliverance style. He's equally compelling on "Tusk" one of the most insane British hit singles ever - grunting his paranoia over those tribal drums and marching majorettes. 

The Buckingham-Nicks chemistry still sizzles. They do that facing-each- other thing, raking over the coals, picking at the scabs of their on again/ off again affair ("Your eyes say yes," she sings, staring into his, "but you don't say yes"). On "Go Your Own Way", they even appear oblivious to the loudest crowd singalong of the night: this is personal. During "Landslide", Stevie squeezes Lindsey's shoulders and kisses his back. At the end, they clasp hands and embrace, and he kisses her hair. There's still love there.

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Review - Reno Gazette-Journal (08.02.2003)

“Don’t Stop” ended the first encore, but not before a fight broke out in the front row. Nicks was visibly upset to see that EMTs were required to provide medical attention.

The second encore included only one song, “Goodbye Baby.” Nicks was so shaken she asked Buckingham to sing for her. Seeing Nicks teary eyed quickly subdued the audience and created a more somber mood to end the show. 

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Review - Arizona Republic (07.21.2003)

Nicks and Buckingham, who amazed the crowd with repeated guitar pyrotechnics, gazed often across the stage at each other as they shared the vocals on songs about the various stages of love, such as "Secondhand News" and "Silver Springs." 

The evening's most electrifying moment came when Nicks sang a smooth, heartfelt rendition of "Landslide," which recently became a hit for the Dixie Chicks. As Buckingham played an acoustic solo, Nicks slipped in behind him and gently massaged his shoulders with her fingers, drawing a relaxed smile from the guitarist. The two grabbed hands at the song's end, and Buckingham, now a married father of two, gave Nicks a tender kiss on her forehead.

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