"When you have two couples, whether they're still together or not, in a band, it's dramatic. It's tense," says Nicks. "I was talking to Don Henley a couple of weeks ago and I said, "Well, you know you were never in love with Glenn Frey or Joe Walsh. It's different.'" 

While it's been 20 years since Buckingham and Nicks broke up, the two are only now putting their past behind them. 

Before their recent reunion, "I had issues about Stevie that hadn't been resolved," says Buckingham. "We had broken up in '77 and I left the band in '87. You'd think, 10 years -- get on with it, buddy." 

But because the two continued to work together for so long after their split, "rather than try to confront each other and resolve anything, I think we just went, "OK, we'll just let it go," says Nicks. 

Adds Buckingham: "Much of the Fleetwood Mac dynamic was an exercise in denial in order to get through it. Now those things have been dealt with so I can appreciate Stevie and feel warm things for her without any of that other stuff." 

The legendary tension between Nicks and Buckingham truly seems to be a thing of the past. 

Sitting together in a small hotel conference room recently just after a large press conference, the two seem so in synch with one another that another kind of Fleetwood Mac reunion -- a romantic one between Nicks and Buckingham -- almost seems feasible. 

Nicks laughs gently at that notion. "Maybe when Lindsey and I are 60 years old, we'll look around and we'll say, "You know what, there just isn't anybody better around. Maybe we'll just get married or something,'" she says. " Lindsey and I ... are becoming really good friends again. It's real nice. I don't think we were all that good of friends before." 

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