Still, Nicks admits that Fleetwood Mac's last studio album, "Tusk" was not exactly up her alley. "Well, "Tusk" wasn't MY album. "Tusk" was mainly Lindsey's conception, dream, everything he ever wanted to do. Everybody just figured that for whatever his reasons were, it was important that he do that and we just sort of sat back and let him do it. I don't mean to sound blase or anything. I was there. I just didn't have very much to do with it. Because if I had had much to do with it, it wouldn't have been a double album and it wouldn't....it wouldn't have been crazy."

"Bella Donna" was released only a few months before Lindsey Buckingham's first solo album "Law and Order," was released. Buckingham recently stated in the L.A. Times that he felt competitive with his former lover. Asked if she feels likewise, Nicks says firmly, "Not at all." When Buckingham's comment is related to her, she explains: "That all goes back to Lindsey and I going together. As wild as the story is and as many times as it's been told, when you go with somebody for six or seven years and you're a woman and the guy you're with is a man who is a guitarist/songwriter, da da da da, and so are you, there's always going to be an ego problem just because of the relationship.

"That problem doesn't seem to come up, working with other men. It just crops up if you have been going with somebody or going out with somebody. I love Lindsey. I love him very, very much and I wanted Lindsey to make it and I wanted this album to be as successful as...If this album is more successful than my album, I would be so glad. You know, when "Trouble" (the single from Buckingham's LP) came out, I was saying, let it go straight to the top. Because it only makes my life easier when Lindsey is happy. 'Cause when Lindsey is happy, he's really in a good humor and he's wonderful and he and I really get along and we're close. For me, when you love somebody, you want them to be the best."


Nicks' contributions include "Straight Back (The Dream Has Just Begun)," "It's Alright" and one that is particularly close to her heart called "Back to the Gypsy," which Nicks says is about her pre-stardom, hippie days in San Francisco, when she used to wait in line for hours outside the Fillmore Auditorium and fantasize about what it would be like to be a star and "arrive at the Fillmore in a big black limousine."

"In basic ways, I haven't changed," she says. "In material ways, of course, I've changed a lot. Because I'm not starving now and I don't have to worry where my rent's coming from and that makes it a lot easier on my blood pressure. I still love all the same things. Every place I live still looks pretty much like my apartment in San Francisco.

"The clothes I wear...that doesn't change. I love long dresses. I love velvet. I love high boots. I never change. I love the same eye make-up. I'm not a fad person. I still have everything I had then. That's one part of me...That's where my songs come from. There's a song on the new Fleetwood Mac album that says, 'Going back to the velvet underground/Back to the floor that I love,' because I always put my bed on the floor." She quotes from the song again. "'To a room with some lace and paper flowers/Back to the gypsy that I was.' And that's San Francisco. That's the velvet underground. Those are the things that I can't give up."

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