CNN: What do you think about, Stevie, when you are out there on stage and you hear "Go Your Own Way?" Does it bring back memories of what you were going through at the time -- because that song was about you, wasn't it?

Nicks: I think.

CNN: Lindsey?

Buckingham: Indeed, it was. Yeah, completely autobiographical. You know, the funny thing was I don't think we were aware we were writing songs specifically to each other. It was really only when our audience picked up on it that it became obvious we were dealing with a completely transparent, autobiographical piece of work.

Nicks: If Lindsey and I had been happy, happy, happy, there would have been no "Go Your Own Way." It would have just been, "Here we are -- happy, happy." And the audience would have been like, "OK, well -- next couple."

So you know, we played off of it. We had fun with it. We could actually walk on stage and have our own little almost-love affair, and have the audience go, "Oh my God! They're getting back together!" And we'd be like, "They're falling for it!" You know, we would totally play it, and we did, and we do, and we always will.

CNN: Why do you continue to do this? Because you could just sit in your beautiful house in England, like Christine, and not have to worry about any of this.

Buckingham: That's a very interesting question. I think there are chapters yet to be written within this group. Look at Stevie and myself. We have known each other since we were in high school.

Nicks: 16 and 17.

Buckingham: And it's been a convoluted road, you know. It's been a great road, and often painful for both of us. We have been extremely close, we have been alienated. It's a road of contrast. But there are still things to be learned, and still things to be shared, and still a certain amount of growing up to do in the never-ending quest to become adults.

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