More:  What inspired that song in particular?

SN: I wrote that as a poem. I was on the road with Fleetwood Mac, I think it was the end of 2004. We were in London, and I met a singer-songwriter named Amanda Ghost. I just loved the fact that her last name was Ghost.  So I just wrote that poem. It’s not about her because I didn't really know her, but the main inspiration was her last name.

    Lots of time I'll get an inspiration, like "The Ghosts Are Gone"-- that's just a sentence.  Then I have to write a story around it.  And so "The Ghosts Are Gone" song actually was about the end of a relationship, in the way that you say, "I'm done forever. This can never be again.”

     It's one of the most solid songs I've ever written. The ghosts are gone: all memories are gone, all feelings are gone, it's as if it never happened. And I don't write too many songs like that.  I always have more or less a hopeful outlook, but in that situation it was like “you are gone to me.”


More:  As far as the subject matter of your songs, they’re pretty timeless, and there’s a broad appeal to all ages, considering the vampire aspect, which so many people today are so interested in – from teens my son’s age to women my age.

SN: I know.  All of my friends are somewhere between 50 and 60 and we are all so into those Twilight books.  I saw the first two movies first, then I wrote “Moonlight.” Then I went back and read them.  So the song's about the second one.  It's about me through the eyes of Bella and Edward, back through their eyes to me.


More:  Have you seen any of True Blood with the sex-crazed vampires?

SN: There's nothing romantic about True Blood.  The whole vampire thing for me is all about forbidden love.  The reason that Edward doesn't want to be with Bella is because he doesn't want her life to be ruined.  It's very unselfish, the way that he looks at it.  And she doesn't care because he's all she wants.  It's Beauty and the Beast.  All the great fairy tales are built around that forbidden, cursed love.

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