"If you would have asked me a year ago if I'd ever be doing this," Buckingham said, "I would have said absolutely not. But here I am. Here I am, enjoying it."


"I didn't especially miss playing those songs. I certainly didn't ever regret leaving. But I've done a bit of growing since then, gotten my footing and sorted out some things in my life. And others in the band, Stevie and Mick in particular, have done the same.

"When we got back together," he continues, "there was a sense of effortlessness, musically and emotionally. I'm surprised that after deciding to get back into this more or less as a career-move strategy, I'm actually enjoying it more now than I had been able to do in our entire 12 years together, because all of the baggage is gone finally."


"The only way we could get our work done was to stuff our feelings off in a corner and get on with the process," Buckingham said. "The whole time was an exercise in denial. Stevie and I broke up in the late '70s, and you'd think that by 1987, the acrimony would be long gone. But for me, there were issues regarding Stevie that I didn't let go of, couldn't let go of, until I left."


Is a return to the studio with Fleetwood Mac a possibility, too?

"The door is certainly open," Buckingham said. "For the first time, I've been able to appreciate that there's a chemistry that goes beyond any logic with us, these five very different, very unlikely people. The whole really is greater than the sum of the parts. I don't say I understand it, there's no analyzing it, but what we have is a very magnetic situation."

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