That good-looking couple with all that talent, it would be amazing to have them in the band. The thing is, they are still that couple when they walk out on the stage every night we play - and no matter what they say, I believe it still beguiles them. They’ve tried extremely hard to be devoid of a connection to each other and they can’t do it.


Stevie had broken up with Lindsey and he’d taken it very, very hard. I could see him suffering, struggling under this great weight. When he simply could pine no more, he started dating to get his mind off Stevie. That upset Stevie terribly, of course, because she still had deep feelings for him and was very confused about her decision to end it. These undercurrents caused endless thinly-veiled arguments to erupt at a moment’s notice.


So I went to Lindsey’s house and I told him about it [S&M’s relationship]. He and Stevie had been broken up for a very long time, but that didn’t matter. I felt a responsibility to tell him, because I knew that there was still something between them, that is still between them. Whether it’s enjoyable or some kind of purgatory, they will go to their graves being connected, like it or not.


So I went to Lindsey’s house and I told him about it [S&M’s relationship]. He and Stevie had been broken up for a very long time, but that didn’t matter. I felt a responsibility to tell him, because I knew that there was still something between them, that is still between them. Whether it’s enjoyable or some kind of purgatory, they will go to their graves being connected, like it or not.


A few weeks after announcing that Fleetwood Mac had officially disbanded, we [Mick and John] found ourselves working with Lindsey again, playing drums and bass on material that he was assembling for a solo album. In truth, I saw it as a new band that I would be forming with Lindsey. But before I knew it, Chris had joined us in the studio, and then Stevie, who wanted Lindsey to write with her on a song for the soundtrack to the film Twister. We were all in the same room, and without me even willing it.


His self-sufficiency proved to be a bigger problem for Stevie than he could have imagined. It made her feel apart and a bit of an outsider when it came to writing. As the only other songwriter in the band, Stevie had thought she and Lindsey were going to have a new and closer creative partnership. But instead, she felt separated from the proceedings, and that was not good. In retrospect, Lindsey has said that he brought in too much of a preconceived vision and if given the chance, he’d not do that again, because it alienated her.


Lindsey began writing differently than he had in the past; he would bring us and Stevie demos that were spare ideas, recorded simply, allowing plenty of space for all of us to contribute. It also left room for a new story to be created between the two of them, or an old one to be picked up again.


Lindsey’s vision for Fleetwood Mac without Christine became fully realised in the decade after Say You Will. He and Stevie had been able to resume where Buckingham Nicks left off, and in some ways revive what was subsumed by Fleetwood Mac. Without Chris in the band, their performance style changed, and their vocal harmonies grew closer to how they were in their early days together. I think the Extended Play EP and our 2013 tour showcased just how much the band has grown into that groove, which has been a wonderful connective bridge for Stevie and Lindsey to explore.

That is one of the reasons we opened our 2013 shows with Second Hand News, a song that has come in and out of our sets through the years. It was written with Chris, but the subject matter is very much Lindsey and Stevie. Beginning the show with it set the tone, because the concerts we played on that tour were very much a celebration of Stevie and Lindsey, and the tremendous musical and personal journey they’ve undertaken within this band.


New versions of songs like ‘Second Hand News’ and 'Without You’, an old Buckingham Nicks demo on the EP, have had the effect of getting Stevie and Lindsey out front and centre, literally and symbolically in every way. It has been a proper revisiting of their dual vocal style, and Lindsey in particular has been exploring this return in the past ten years.


He [Lindsey] wrote a number of songs for the EP that didn’t make the final cut, but all of them were designed with Stevie in mind; to sing on, to put words to - all of them expressly for her. Of the songs that did make the EP, the most poignant of his, ‘It Takes Time’, was a homecoming to their story because it’s entirely an apology to her, which is beautiful and heartbreaking.


Overall, the last few years have been a wonderful return to form. I was hoping that we would take this new approach even further on the last tour, and have Stevie and Lindsey do songs together that Chris used to do on her own, and reinterpret them through the lens of Buckingham Nicks. We used to try and do that but the efforts always got dumped. I understood why; Lindsey and Stevie felt they were trespassing in Christine’s world. Had we pushed, they would have found a way to bring them together, but that didn’t happen. I’ve even thought about what it would be like if they sang songs together that usually sing alone - imagine Lindsey joining Stevie for ‘Landslide’ or Stevie coming out when he plays 'Big Love’? If that ever happens, it will be one for the books.

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