"When I think of going home, I think of Menlo-Atherton High School and San Jose," says Nicks, who began her singing career while studying speech communication at San Jose State University and playing clubs and opening concerts all over the Bay Area with a group that included Buckingham, called the Fritz Raybine Memorial Band.

Those years prepared her for what would come next. Playing the Fillmore and other large venues, opening for the likes of Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin, Chicago and Santana, she got an idea of how to project herself.

She left San Jose for L.A. in 1971 and continued working with Buckingham, and in 1974 the duo was asked to join Fleetwood Mac. Within five months, the revitalized band had recorded one of the biggest-selling records in history and was out on the road.

"Within six months we were rich and totally famous," Nicks recalls. She was living every rocker's dream. "I didn't have to go through a lot of the stuff a lot of women in music have to go through. For our first shows, we had first class tickets and limos.

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