CONTENTS

March 13, 2009. Uniondale, NY
March 16, 2009. Rochester, NY
March 25, 2009. Montreal, QC
March 26, 2009. Toronto, ON

April 15, 2009. Philadelphia, PA
April 18, 2009. Columbus, OH
April 22, 2009. Tampa, FL
April 23, 2009. Ft. Lauderdale, FL
April 25, 2009. Charlotte, NC

May 5, 2009. Saint Louis, MO
May 8, 2009. Kansas City, MO
May 10, 2009. Denver, CO
May 20, 2009. Oakland, CA
May 21, 2009. San Jose, CA
May 28, 2009. Los Angeles, CA.
May 31, 2009. San Diego, CA

June 8, 2009. Milwaukee, WI
June 10, 1009. Baltimore, MD
June 11, 2009. New York, NY
June 13, 2009. Atlantic City, NJ
June 16, 2009. Manchester, NH
June 17, 2009. Uncasville, CT
June 19, 2009. Nashville, TN
June 20, 2009. New Orleans, LA

October 10, 2009. Stockholm, Sweden
October 15, 2009. Rotterdam, Holland
October 17, 2009. Paris, France
October 19, 2009. Berlin, Germany
October 20, 2009. Glasgow, UK
October 27, 2009. Manchester, UK
October 30th, 2009. London, UK

December 1, 2009. Melbourne, Australia
December 7th, 2009. Sydney, Australia


March 13, 2009. Uniondale, NY

This next song is, uh, a song from Tusk and I never before this time ever wanted to explain why this was written. It’s kinda hard to explain actually why it was written, but there was a time when if things were really getting to me, I would take my bed off the bed-frame and put it on the floor. Just throw some coverlets on it, put some paper flowers around, and this would be comforting to me. This was what Lindsey and I had because that was all we had was a bed on the floor. And then one day we got all famous and this whole thing happened and - So up until now whenever I feel like I need to be calm or I need to go back before this was all so wild and crazy, I take my bed off the frame and put it on the floor. And I pretend. And as a postscript to that, in Los Angeles right now, my bed is on the floor. So there, from that came this song. It’s called Gypsy.

March 16, 2009. Rochester, NY

Um, in 19-, somewhere in 1977/78 I wrote this next song and - I was just going over this in my head today about when it was written, and it was written during the whole Rumours period. And it’s about, um, going back to who we were before this all happened. And, for me, that is taking my bed off the frame and putting it on the floor, going back to like my hippie days or Lindsey’s and my San Francisco days. So, and then Velvet Underground - San Francisco. Back to the velvet underground, back to the floor that I loved, back to the gypsy that I was. Searching for some kind of calm and reality in this world of unreality and fantasticness, and then I pretend, and I still do this to this day. Right now, in Los Angeles, my bed is on the floor, obviously searching for that calm and peace that really one never really finds. So you just have to be in a band of thieves and try to be a gypsy and try to keep a hold of some of that thing that you used to have. 

March 25, 2009. Montreal, QC

This next song, in all the years that we have been playing, has never gotten an introduction. Until this time, because I thought ‘Well, it’s one of the few that hasn’t actually been told’. Uh, this was written in 1977, 1978 - not sure - sometime during those two years, and it was written about getting very, very famous very, very fast. And, for me, what I used to do to combat this, was I would - with my newfound money and our newfound bedroom set - I would take the bed off the frame and put it on the floor, and move everything out of the road except for a lamp and some paper flowers. And going back to the velvet underground - San Francisco. Back to the floor that I loved. To a room with some lace and paper flowers. Back to the gypsy that I was. 

March 26, 2009. Toronto, ON

This song was written in 1977, maybe 1978. I’m now repeating myself; I really honestly don’t remember which one of those years it was. But one of those years, I was looking for a way to find some kind of peace from all this amazing - What happened to us when we joined Fleetwood Mac was like, we really went from no money to having quite a lot of money in two years. It was a very big deal. So as I’m searching on my lifelong travel of peace-searching, what I would do was I would take my bed off the frame and put it on the floor. Take everything out of my room, just put a lamp, and have it to be really calm, and that is how I would pretend that it was before Fleetwood Mac, when I was still at some sort of sanity. Ah! So, anyway, I’m back to the velvet underground - San Francisco, back to the floor that I love, to a room with some lace and paper flowers. Back to the gypsy that I was.

April 15, 2009. Philadelphia, PA

So this next song, um, for the first sixteen shows - we just took a little two week break - and for the first sixteen shows, I was explaining this one song has one meaning. So I thought about it over the last two weeks, and I decided there’s like many meanings to this song, so I’ll tell you another meaning than the meaning I was telling two weeks ago. Um, when Lindsey and I first moved down to Los Angeles, um, we missed San Francisco so much. Because we lived in San Francisco during - Well, he lived there his whole life but I moved there in 1966, so it was ’66 to ’70, which was the greatest time in music history, of all time, in San Francisco. And we were right in the middle of it, and we got to open for all these amazing bands and we got to watch it happening as it happened. [audience member calls out ‘How stoned were you?’] Pretty darn stoned. And, um, the great thing was, I mean, this song that we’re going to do next was, it was about the velvet underground that was San Francisco. So this song was a song about back to the velvet underground, back to the floor that I loved, back to a room with some paper flowers. It was all about wanting to be back in San Francisco in the middle of that amazing place where our hearts really were. And that’s what this song is about. Many meanings. Gypsy. 

April 18, 2009. Columbus, OH

This next song that we’re going to do was written about many different things. So when we’re going around on the road telling these stories, I tell sort of a different story in different cities about how this one song was written. This song stems from Lindsey and I living in San Francisco. I moved up there when I was a senior in high school at the end of 1965, and he was a junior. I met him for one night and one day. It wasn’t really a night, it was a day. And then I never saw him again for two years and, uh, I joined his band. And that was 1968, and we were right smack dab in the heart of the greatest time in musical history in San Francisco. So this song was written about that time and how amazing it was, and how much fun he and I had, and how much we loved it and how much we missed it and how much we related to the velvet underground, which was before Fleetwood Mac and it was San Francisco. So when I say ‘back to the velvet underground, back to the floor, back to the paper flowers, back to the gypsies that we were’, that’s what it means.

April 22, 2009. Tampa, FL

Well, this next song was written about a time in our lives that we look back on with great love and wish in a lot of ways that it was still here. Um, when I was a senior in high school, I moved to San Francisco and I met Lindsey. I was a senior and he was a junior, and I only really met him for one day and I didn’t see him again for two years. Two years later, he and his band called me and asked me if I wanted to be in their band. That was 1968. So from 1968 to almost 1971, we were smack dab in the middle of the greatest musical scene in the world ever. Oh yeah. And we got to watch the great ones. We got to watch Janis Joplin and Jimi Hendrix and all of those people. And so this song was written - In my heart, I would refer to San Francisco as the velvet underground. So when I say ‘So I’m back to the velvet underground, back to the floor that I love’, back to when things were simpler, to the roses and the paper flowers, and back to the gypsies that we were. 

April 23, 2009. Ft. Lauderdale, FL

In 1965, um, when I was just going to be a senior in high school, my family got transferred from Los Angeles up to San Francisco. And, um, one day I met Lindsey Buckingham. I was a senior and he was a junior, and I didn’t see him again for two years. He and his band called me for whatever, I don’t even know what reason, called me and asked me to be in their band. And so all of a sudden I was in this really great band, and we were smack dab in the middle of the greatest musical scene, in my opinion, of all time - San Francisco, Haight-Ashbury, Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin. We opened for all these bands, so we had this experience before we came into Fleetwood Mac. We actually had that experience. And so this next song was written about my memories of that time between 1968 when I joined Lindsey’s band and 1971, and so when I talk about the velvet underground, I’m talking about San Francisco. ‘So I’m back to the velvet underground, back to the floor that I loved, to a room with some lace and paper flowers’, back to the gypsies that he and I were.

April 25, 2009. Charlotte, NC

In 1965 my family was transferred from Los Angeles up to San Francisco. I was a senior. Lindsey was a junior, and I met him one day and I never saw him again for two years. He and his band called me and asked me if I wanted to be in their band. I didn’t really have any idea what kind of band it was but I’m like, "Yeah. What kind of band is it?" Little did I know that I was being thrown into a) a really great band and b) the greatest musical scene in the entire world [crowd noises overpowering speech] to 1970. So when I say that we’re back to the velvet underground, that’s San Francisco, where we came from. Back to the floor where our bed was. To the roses and the paper flowers and back to the gypsies that we were. That we miss.

May 5, 2009. Saint Louis, MO

… He was a junior, and I met him one day and then I never saw him again for two years. His band - I think he had his drummer call me. In fact I know that’s what happened - His drummer Bob called me and said, "Do you want to be in our band?" and I’m like, "What kind of band is it?" He’s like, "It’s a really hard rock San Francisco band," and I’m like, "I’m so in." So anyway, (?) into this really great band, into - in my opinion - the most fantastic era in music in the world ever. From 1965 to 1970, San Francisco, Haight-Ashbury, Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin, Buffalo Springfield, Crosby, Stills & Nash, and on and on and on. And we were such a part of it. So when I wrote this next song, it’s my memory of that time. ‘So I’m back to the velvet underground’ - San Francisco. ‘Back to the floor’ - where Lindsey and I lived, all we had was a bed. ‘Back to the roses, the paper flowers’ that I loved. Back to the gypsies that he and I were. Back to the gypsies. 

May 8, 2009. Kansas City, MO

In 1965 I moved to San Francisco. My parents were transferred from Los Angeles right before my senior year. I was a senior and Lindsey was a junior, and I met him for one day during that one year - 1965. And I never saw him again. For two years. And he had his drummer call me two years later and ask me if I wanted to be in their band. I had no idea what kind of band this was. "What kind of band is it?’"Of course, living in San Francisco in the middle of what was happening in San Francisco at that point, he goes, "Well, it’s really a hard rock ’n’ roll band," and I’m like, "Oh, yeah!!!! I can do that!" So this next song is basically my memories of 1965 to 1970. 'So I’m back to the velvet underground’ - San Francisco, Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin. ‘Back to the floor’ - Lindsey’s and my bed. ‘Back to the roses and the paper flowers.’ Back to the gypsies that he and I were.

May 10, 2009. Denver, CO

In 1965 my parents were transferred from Los Angeles to San Francisco, so I went into San Francisco as a new senior in high school. Lindsey was a junior. I met him one day, sometime during that year, and then I didn’t see him again for two years. Um, two years later his drummer, Bob, called me and said "Would you like to be in our band?" And my answer to that was, "What kind of band is it?" And he said, "Well, it’s a really hard rock San Francisco rock ’n’ roll band." And I’m like "Oh yeah!!!!" Where’s my hairbrush? I can do it! So I was instantly catapulted into this amazing band with these amazing people and, uh, into the most amazing musical scene, I think, in the history of the world. Between 1965 and 1970, San Francisco, Janis Joplin, Jimi Hendrix, Crosby, Stills & Nash, Neil Young. It was quite an experience. So this next song really relates back to that time. ‘So I’m back to the velvet underground’ - San Francisco. ‘Back to the floor’ - where our bed was. We had no furniture. Um, ‘to the roses and the paper flowers’. And back to the gypsies that we were. 

May 20, 2009. Oakland, CA

In 1965 I moved to San Francisco from Los Angeles. I was a new senior at Menlo-Atherton High School. Lindsey was a junior. I met him once. I never saw him again for two years. And, uh, a friend of his that was in the band that he was in - I don’t like to say, it wasn’t exactly all your band. It was your band and the three other wonderful guys who were in our band. Well, he put the phone call off on Bob the drummer. He’s not good at phone calls. Not then, not now. He must’ve said, "Bob, call this girl Stevie I met two year ago. She sang a song. I think she can sing. Call and see if she wants to be in our band." So he did and that Monday, just three days later, I was at Lindsey’s house at five-thirty in the afternoon getting ready to start rehearsal for this amazing band that I had been so gently and amazingly thrown into. In my opinion, the greatest musical time in the entire world was between 1965 and 1970 here in San Francisco. This band that I joined was so good that within two or three months we were opening for Janis Joplin. We were watching Jimi Hendrix go crazy onstage. Quicksilver Messenger, Leon Russell, Santana in Monterey and we had lunch with them the next day. Our life was so amazing and electrifying every single day. So this next song, which was written ten years after that, was my memories of this time here in my city, your city. ‘So I’m back to the velvet underground’ - San Francisco. ‘Back to the floor that I loved’ - Lindsey’s and my bed. 'To a room with some lace and paper flowers' - our little house in Los Gatos. Back to the gypsies that he and I were.

May 21, 2009. San Jose, CA

In 1965, my parents were transferred up here to San Francisco, San Jose, to Atherton, California. Um, I was a new senior there and Lindsey was a junior. I met him once and then I didn't see him again for two years. Um, Bob, the drummer in our band, called us, called me, and said, "Would you like to be in our band?" And I, who was at this point getting ready to go to San Jose State, said, "Oh yes, of course I can be in the band! What kind of band is it?" And the answer was a full-hearted, "It's a hard-rockin' San Francisco band." So there I was in San Jose State, trying to go to school. My parents said that they would support me - and that if need be, they'd even support Lindsey - as long as I stayed at school. So I went to school all day. I drove from San Jose to Menlo-Atherton, where Lindsey and I both, where our parents lived, practised for five hours, drove back to San Jose State, studied all night, got back in the car, drove back. Four times a week. We played Thursday, Friday, Saturday, sometimes Sunday. It was very magical. We were thrown into the middle of watching Jimi Hendrix go crazy on the stage of San Jose's (?) Festival, Janis Joplin at Frost Amphitheater, Santana at Monterey, which we also had lunch with them the next day. Every - Quicksilver Messenger, Leon Russell, every - I can't even remember. My mind goes blank but it was the most electrifying thing. And then really ending up with we played Winterland, we played Avalon Ballroom, we played the Fillmore West. And - I've never told this little story before. Lindsey's going to come over here and beat me to death with the guitar any second now. But we played the Fillmore - don't do it - and we were up there. And we were like so completely stoked to be on the - Even though we were the tenth band opening for Chicago. And there was some guy in the audience who was actually kind of harassing me. Never happened since. And Bill Graham walked out on our stage - I don't know if you remember this - and said, "Get out of my Fillmore and never come back!" And I said to myself, "We don't even know this man but we have arrived." So here in San Jose, where Bill Graham was such a presence, I would like to tell you about this next song. When I wrote this, it was ten years later. Um, when I think back on these memories, it's back to the velvet underground, which is San Francisco, San Jose, and the whole surrounding area. Back to the floor where Lindsey's and my bed was. Back to our house with paper roses in Los Gatos. Back to the gypsies that he and I were. Here, where it started. 

May 28, 2009. Los Angeles, CA

In 1965, my family got transferred from here, from Los Angeles, from Arcadia, up to San Francisco. I was a new senior. Lindsey was a junior. I met him for one day and then I never saw him again for two years. Um, he was in a band in San Francisco, and he had his drummer call me and see if I wanted to join their band. And I said, "Well, what kind of band is it?" And they said, 'Well, you know, it's a hard-rockin' San Francisco band." And I'm like, "Alright! I can do it!!!" Two days later, I'm in Lindsey's house practicing from five-thirty to ten-thirty every night, four days a week, playing Friday, Saturday, sometimes Sunday. The greatest musical time, in my opinion, of all time: between '65 and '70 in San Francisco. We opened for Janis Joplin at Stanford Frost Amphitheater. We watched Jimi Hendrix go crazy on the stage in front of 50,000 people at San Jose State. We went to lunch with Santana right after their first album came out. We played Winterland. We played Avalon. We played Fillmore West. We met Bill Graham. It was as electrifying as you could possibly imagine. And romantic as you could possibly imagine. This song - ten years later - was written about those five years. Um, 'So I'm back to the velvet underground' - back to San Francisco. 'Back to the floor that I loved' - Lindsey's and my bed. 'Back to a room with some paper flowers and roses' - back to our little house in San Jose. Back to the gypsies that he and I were.

May 31, 2009. San Diego, CA

In 1965 my family was transferred from Los Angeles up to San Francisco. I was a senior. Lindsey was a junior. I met him one day during that one year, then I didn’t see him again for two years. Uh, he was in a band, and he must’ve said to the drummer in his band, "Will you call that girl that I met two years ago and ask her if she wants to sing in our band?" So he did. And I said, "Well, what kind of a band is it?" And he said, "It’s a hard rockin’ San Francisco band." And of course I’m like, “Oh yes! I can do it!!!" Monday morn - Monday afternoon, I was at practice at Lindsey’s house. Um, from that day onward, for three solid years, we practiced Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and we played Friday and Saturday. I was catapulted into what I consider to be the greatest musical scene of all time - between 1965 and 1971. We opened for Janis Joplin at the Frost Amphitheater at Stanford. We stood on the stage and opened for Jimi Hendrix and watched him go crazy at San Jose State in front of 50,000 people. We opened for Santana right when their first big album came out and had lunch with them the next day. We played the Avalon Ballroom in San Francisco. Winterland. Fillmore West. But this part of the story - which I don’t usually tell every night when I’m telling this story - One of the last things we did in this band was - Our only real roadtrip, we went from San Francisco to Monterey. Then we drove to Salt Lake City and played the Salt Palace. Then we drove here and played the San Diego Sports Arena with Quicksilver Messenger and Leon Russell. It was a massive concert and then we went to the Santa Monica Civic. So that was the first case of actually being on the road that we had. So when I was driving up here today, I’m like, "It looks exactly the same as it did in 1969." Even the dressing rooms! Anyway, this long drawn out story leads to this next song. Ten years later, my memories of that whole time, um, culminated in this song. ‘So I’m back to the velvet underground’ - San Francisco. ‘Back to the floor that I love’ - Lindsey’s and my bed. ‘Back to a room with some lace and paper flowers’ - our little house in San Jose. Back to the gypsies that he and I were.

June 8, 2009. Milwaukee, WI

In 1965 I moved to San Francisco from Los Angeles. I was a senior in high school. Lindsey was a junior. I met him one day, then I didn’t ever see him again for two years. He was in a really great band, and his drummer called me and asked me if I wanted to be in this band. I said, "Well, yeah, I think I would love to be in the band but what kind of band is it?" And he said, "It’s a really hard rockin’ San Francisco band." And I’m like, "I’m so there." Three days later I was so there. In practice. Four days a week, playing two and sometimes three days a week. Opening for Janis Joplin - Stanford Frost Amphitheater. Watching Jimi Hendrix go crazy in front of 75,000 people at San Jose State. Playing the Fillmore, playing the Avalon Ballroom, playing Winterland. Opening for Santana at their first album was coming out and going out to lunch with them the next day. It was as electrifying as you could possibly imagine. Romantic, beautiful, so exciting. Ten years later, my memories of that time went into this song that is next. Um, ‘so I’m back to the velvet underground’ - San Francisco. ‘Back to the floor that I loved’ - Lindsey’s and my bed. ‘Back to a room with some lace and some paper flowers’ - our little house in San Jose. Back to the gypsies that he and I were.  

June 10, 1009. Baltimore, MD

In 1965 my family was transferred from Los Angeles to San Francisco. I was a senior and Lindsey was a junior. I met him one time, and never saw him again for two years. Two years later, the drummer of the band he was in called me and asked me if I would like to join their band. And my reaction was, "What kind of band is it?" And he said, "Well, it’s San Francisco, babe. It’s a hard rockin’ rock band." I’m like, "Okay! I can do it!" Two days later I drive over to Lindsey’s house, who, unbeknownst to me, lived right down the street, and I’m catapulted into what I consider to be the greatest musical scene of all time - between 1965 and 1971 in San Francisco. Whereupon we watched Jimi Hendrix play in front of 75,000 people at San Jose State. We opened for Santana when their first breakthrough album came out and had lunch with them the next day. We played the Fillmore, Winterland, Avalon Ballroom. We - I mean, that’s not even half of the story. We did it all. It was as romantic and as electrifying as you could possibly imagine for a couple of really young kids. So when I looked back on that time ten years later, I wrote this next song, which you’ll understand more now. It says ‘So I’m back to the velvet underground’ - San Francisco. ‘Back to the floor that I love’ - Lindsey’s and my bed. ‘Back to a room with some lace and some paper flowers’ - our little house in San Jose. Back to the gypsies that he and I were. 

June 11, 2009. New York, NY

When you get to be 61 years old, sometimes you forget. Alright, my story is is that in 1965 my parents got transferred up to San Francisco from Los Angeles. I was a senior and Lindsey was a junior. I met him one day during that year, and I never saw him or heard from him again for two years. Two years later his drummer called and asked me if I would like to join their band. Which, of course, I didn’t even know existed. I said, "Yeah, I would. What kind of band is it?" And, "It’s a really hard rock ’n’ roll San Francisco band." And I’m like, "I can do it! I’m in." So two days later I’m driving down the street to Lindsey’s house - didn’t know that either - for practice. Practicing four days a week, playing two nights a week. We were thrown into the greatest time in music in my opinion, which was 1965 to 1971, San Francisco, Haight-Ashbury. We opened for Janis Joplin at Stanford Frost Amphitheater. We watched Jimi Hendrix go crazy in front of 75,000 people at San Jose State. We opened for Santana right as their big huge first album came out and had lunch with them the next day. We played the Avalon Ballroom, Fillmore West, Winterland. We got to, we got to be onstage with almost every big act of that time. It was as electrifying and romantic and dreamy as you could possibly imagine it was. So ten years later when I wrote this next song, my memories of how truly glorious it was became the song. ‘So I’m back to the velvet underground’ - San Francisco. ‘Back to the floor that I love’ - Lindsey’s and my bed. ‘Back to a room with some lace and paper flowers’ - our little house in San Jose. Back to the gypsies that he and I were. 

June 13, 2009. Atlantic City, NJ

In 1965 my parents got transferred from Los Angeles up to San Francisco. I was a senior and Lindsey was a junior. I met him one day, then I never saw him or heard from him again for two years. Two years later, the drummer in the band that he was in called me and said, "Would you like to be in our band?" And I said, "Well, I think so. What kind of band is it?" And he said, "It’s a hard rock San Francisco band." And I’m like, "I’m so in! I’m there!" Two days later I was driving down the street to Lindsey’s house - which of course I didn’t know he lived right down the street from me but he did - to practice. Where we practiced four days a week and played two days a week. It was, in my opinion, the greatest musical time of all time - between 1965 and 1971 in San Francisco, Haight-Ashbury and that entire music scene. We opened for Janis Joplin at Stanford Frost Amphitheater. We opened for Jimi Hendrix and watched him go nuts onstage in front of 75,000 people at San Jose State. We opened for Santana right before their big, their first big album came out, and had lunch with them the next day. We played Winterland, we played the Avalon Ballroom, we played the Fillmore. It was electrifying and dreamy and fairytale-like as you could possibly imagine. Mesmerising. Ten years later I wrote this song, this next song. My memories of that time. ‘So I’m back to the velvet underground’, which was San Francisco. ‘Back to the floor that I loved’, which was Lindsey’s and my bed. ‘Back to a room with some lace and some paper flowers’, our little house in San Jose. Back to the gypsies that he and I were.

June 16, 2009. Manchester, NH

In 1965 our family got transferred from Los Angeles up to San Francisco. I was a senior in high school. Lindsey was a junior. I met him one day and then I never saw him or heard of or from him again for two years. Two years later he was in a band, and the drummer in his band called me and asked me would I be interested in joining their band. And I said, "Well, what kind of band is it?" And he said, "It’s a hard rockin’ San Francisco band." (?) "I can do it! Yes, I’d love to be in your band!" Two days later, I’m driving down the street to Lindsey’s house, who I had no idea lived right down the street from me, and, uh, I was thrown into four days of practice a week, two shows a week. I was going to school; they weren’t. They didn’t care that I was going to school, I must say. I was doing it all. Not to mention that we were thrown right into the middle of, in my opinion, the greatest musical scene of all time between 1965 and 1971, San Francisco, Haight-Ashbury. We opened for Janis Joplin at Stanford Frost Amphitheater. We opened for Jimi Hendrix at San Jose State Fair for 60,000 people. We opened for Santana two days before their first huge album came out and had lunch with them the next day. We played Winterland Ballroom, we played Avalon Ballroom, we played the Fillmore West. We did it all in those three years. We really got to stand on the stage and watch the whole Woodstock era in front of us. It was as romantic and as fairytale-like as you could possibly imagine. So ten years later when I put this into a song, it became this song. ‘So I’m back to the velvet underground’ - San Francisco. ‘Back to the floor that I loved’ - Lindsey’s and my bed. ‘To a house, to a room with roses and paper flowers’ - to our little house in San Jose. Back to the gypsies that he and I were. 

June 17, 2009. Uncasville, CT

In 1965 my family got transferred from Los Angeles up to San Francisco. I was a new senior and Lindsey was a junior. I met him one day and then I never saw him or heard of him again until two years ago, two years after that. I’m sorry. Now I forget more parts of the story than I’m remembering as we go along. Um, two years later the drummer in his band called me and asked me if I would like to join their band. And I said, "Absolutely. What kind of a band is it?" And they said it was a hard rock ’n’ roll - hard In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida like - rock ’n’ roll band. And I’m like *whispers* I’ve never done anything like that before! *normal voice* But I rock away from the phone and go like and I come right back to the phone and say, "Of course!" Two days later I’m driving to Lindsey’s house, which is right down the street from my mom and dad’s house unbeknownst to me, and four days a week practice, two days a week playing. For three years. We were thrown into the middle of what I consider to be the greatest musical scene of all time between 1965 and 1971 in San Francisco, Haight-Ashbury. It was truly glorious. We opened for Janis Joplin, we opened for Jimi Hendrix, we opened for the - You know, we, I can’t even think about it, it’s too much. I’m too tired to even tell you all the people we opened for. We opened for everybody. And it was as totally romantic and fairytale-like as you could imagine. Um, ten years later when I would think back over all these amazing memories, it ended up in this song that we’re going to do next. ‘So I’m back to the velvet underground’ - San Francisco. ‘Back to the floor that I loved’ - Lindsey’s and my bed. ‘Back to a room with some lace and some paper flowers’ - our little house in San Jose. Back to the gypsies that he and I were. 

June 19, 2009. Nashville, TN

In 1965 my family got transferred from Los Angeles up to San Francisco. I was a new senior there. Lindsey was a junior. I met him one day, and then I never saw or heard from him again for two years. Two years later the drummer in the band that he was in called me and asked me if I wanted to join their band. I said, "Well, what kind of band is it?" Now only here in Nashville can I say here is the twist of fate, because this could’ve been any kind of band. Could’ve been a country band, could’ve been a jazz band, could’ve been a rock band. The drummer said, "It’s a hard rock ’n’ roll San Francisco band." I’m like, "Excuse me for a moment. I think I can do that." So I was catapulted into what I consider to be the most amazing time in musical history for rock ’n’ roll, between 1965 and 1971 in San Francisco, Haight-Ashbury. Lindsey and I opened for Janis Joplin. We opened for Jimi Hendrix and saw him go crazy in front of 75,000 people at San Jose State. We played the Fillmore West, we played the Avalon Ballroom, we played Winterland. We opened for Santana two days before their record came out and had lunch with them the next day in Monterey. It was as earth-defying and romantic and electric as you could possibly imagine. Ten years later my memories of this time came out in this next song. ‘So I’m back to the velvet underground’ - San Francisco. ‘Back to the floor that I love’ - Lindsey’s and my bed. ‘Back to a room with some roses and paper flowers’ - our little house in San Jose. Back to the gypsies that he and I were then.

June 20, 2009. New Orleans, LA

In 1965 my family was transferred from Los Angeles up to San Francisco. I was a senior in high school. Lindsey was a junior. I met him one day, and then I never saw or heard from him again for two years. Two years later the drummer in the band that Lindsey had put together and was in, whatever I don’t even know because I don’t know what happened for that two years. He was in a band and they called me and asked me if I wanted to join their band. And I said, "Well, what kind of band is it?" It could’ve been any kind of band. And he said, "Oh, it’s a hard rockin’ rock band from San Francisco," and I’m like, "Just a minute. Okay, I’d love to!" So the next day I drove to Lindsey’s house for practice, which was four days a week. And we played two nights a week. And in that time we were catapulted into what I consider to be the greatest musical time in rock ’n’ roll ever - from 1965 to 1971 in San Francisco, Haight-Ashbury. We opened for Janis Joplin at Stanford University. We opened for Jimi Hendrix at San Jose State in front of 75,000 people. We opened for Santana two days before their first really big record came out and had lunch the next day. We played the Fillmore, we played Avalon Ballroom, we played Winterland. We got to open and sat on the same stage with just about every great rock ’n’ roll band of that time. It was as electrifying and magical as maybe you here in this city might relate to, because your city is a magical, musical city too. So ten years later I wanted to write down those memories before they faded into oblivion and put it down in song. And that song became this next song. ‘So I’m back to the velvet underground’ - San Francisco. ‘Back to the floor that I love’ - Lindsey’s and my bed. ‘Back to a room with some lace and some paper flowers’ - our little house in San Jose. Back to the gypsies that he and I were.  

October 10, 2009. Stockholm, Sweden

In 1965 my family was transferred from Los Angeles up to San Francisco. I was going to be a new senior, twelfth grade, and Lindsey was a junior, eleventh grade. I met him one day during that year, and never saw him again for two, almost two and a half years. Um, two and a half years later he was in a band in San Francisco, and they called me and asked me if I wanted to join their band. And I said, "Yeah, I’d love to join your band." I had no idea what kind of band it was but I didn’t care. I remembered him and I thought, ‘I can be in a band with this guy.’ So next thing I know, I’m driving to Lindsey’s house for practice on Monday. It was like a Friday, so it was next Monday. And so Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, we practiced. Friday and Saturday we played. For three years. And during that three years we were, had the honor of opening up for every big band in America - and also from pretty much all the European bands also - Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin, all the English blues bands, the San Francisco blues bands. Um, there’s so many that my mind always goes blank when I’m trying to tell this story. But suffice to say it was so magical and such an electric time in our life. Ten years later - after I had joined Fleetwood Mac and Lindsey joined Fleetwood Mac and we were pretty firmly ensconced in Fleetwood Mac - I looked back on that time and realized what an amazing time in our lives it had been. And that’s where this song came from. ‘So I’m back to the velvet underground’ - San Francisco. ‘Back to the floor that I love’ - our little house. ‘To a room with some roses and paper flowers’ - to our bedroom. And back to the gypsies that we were then. And so much miss today. 

October 15, 2009. Rotterdam, Holland

In 1965 my family was transferred from Los Angeles to San Francisco. I was a new twelfth grader and Lindsey was in the eleventh grade. Um, I met him halfway through that year. I never heard from him or saw him again for a little over two years. Um, one day the phone rang and it was Lindsey’s drummer calling me to ask me if I wanted to join their band. And I said, "Well, what kind of band is it?" And he said, "Well, you know, we live in San Francisco. It’s a total hard rock band." And I’m like, "Yes, I think I can do that!" So from that moment onward, my life changed. I was on my way to practice two days later on Monday. To Lindsey’s house. We practiced Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday; we played Friday and Saturday, sometimes Sunday, for three solid years. And we were catapulted into the amazing music scene that was San Francisco during that time. We opened, we got to open for all of the big bands, all of the big European blues bands, all the big American bands - Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin, the list - My mind always goes blank when I try to tell this story, but we opened for just about everybody. And the perk of opening for those bands was that you got to stand on the side of the stage and watch them, and take that in, and learn from them. So that when we joined Fleetwood Mac we walked in with a little big of confidence. So ten years later, when I wanted to put this all down in some kind of song, I really realized how important those years had been to me and how much I missed them and how really beautiful they were. Sometimes when things are happening to you, you don’t get it until you have walked away from it. So here came this song. ‘So I’m back to the velvet underground’ - San Francisco. ‘Back to the floor that I loved’ - our little house. ‘Back to a room with some lace and paper flowers’ - our bedroom. Back to the gypsies that we were.

October 17, 2009. Paris, France

In 1965 my family was transferred from Los Angeles up to San Francisco. I was a senior in high school; I was in the twelfth grade. Lindsey was a junior; he was in the eleventh grade. Um, I met him one day and then I never saw him again for two years. He, by then, had formed a band and they’d been playing for quite a long time. And they called and asked if I wanted to join their band. And I said, "What kind of band is it?" And they said, "It’s a really hard rock rock ’n’ roll band," and I’m like, "I think I can do do that." So my life changed that day. I was thrown into this really great band that had been, as I said, playing for quite a while, and they were great. And, uh, we started playing very big shows where we opened - Like we would open up for a show like this but there would be like eight acts, and we would be first. The perk to that was that we got to stand on the side of the stage and watch. Um, we opened for every great band - for all the great European bands, for all the great American bands, for Jimi Hendrix, for Janis Joplin. I can never remember when I try to tell this story but all of them. And that is where Lindsey and I really learned our trades so that when we joined Fleetwood Mac, we could could walk on their stage and be fairly confident. Because we had played for three years in a band that wasn’t as good but nevertheless we were out there. So ten years later, when I looked back on this amazing three years, I wrote this next song. And it is my memory of that time. ‘So I’m back to the velvet underground’ - San Francisco. ‘Back to the floor that I loved’ - Lindsey’s and my little house. ‘Back to a room with some paper flowers and roses’ - our bedroom. Back to the gypsies that we were. 

October 19, 2009. Berlin, Germany

In 1965 my family was transferred from Los Angeles up to San Francisco. I was in the twelfth grade, going into the twelfth grade, and Lindsey was a junior; he was in the eleventh grade. And I met him one day, and then I never saw him again or basically heard from him again and, uh, two years later he had been in a band for two years. And they called me and asked me if I wanted to be in their band, and I was already singing and playing my guitar and writing songs. I hadn’t really ever thought about being in a band and I’m like, "Well, what kind of band?" He said, "Well, it’s San Francisco. It’s a really hard rock band." And I went, "Yes!!!! I want to be in a hard rock band!" So the next day my life has changed. I’m in my car; I’m driving to Lindsey’s and, uh, for practice. We practiced Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday. We played Friday and Saturday. I’m going to college. They’re not. So I’m studying and I’m in a full-time band. They’re not. They don’t care very much about the fact that I’m going to school. So we are catapulted into this amazing world of music. Uh, we opened for - I’m going to make a list and put it on the floor from now on - We opened for every band. For all the big European bands, for all the big American bands, for Jimi Hendrix, for Janis Joplin, for all the blues bands, for all the San Francisco bands. It was, in my opinion, the most electrifying time in musical history. And we were a part of it. When you opened for these bands the perk you got was like, as if it was this show, you got to stand on the side of the stage and watch. Nobody got to stand on the side of the stage and watch except us. And that’s really where we learned - Lindsey and I, especially - and honed our craft, so that when we walked into Fleetwood Mac, we were actually able to not just be terrified. Anyway, ten years later I wanted to put this down, this experience of these three years. So I wrote this next song. ‘So I’m back to the velvet underground’ - that’s San Francisco. ‘Back to the floor that I love’ - Lindsey’s and my little house. ‘Back to a room with some lace and paper flowers’ - our bedroom. Back to the gypsies that he and I were. 

October 20, 2009. Glasgow, UK

In 1965 my family was transferred from Los Angeles up to San Francisco. I was in the twelfth grade, a senior, and Lindsey was in eleventh grade; he was a junior. One year behind me. I met him one day that year, and I never saw him again for two years. Um, two years later he had started a band and they were playing all over town and they called me and asked if I wanted to be in their band. And my first question was, "What kind of band is it?" He said, "Well, it’s San Francisco. It’s a really hard rock San Francisco band." And I’m like, "Yesssss! I think I can do that." The next thing I know I’m driving to Lindsey’s house on Monday, thrown into this thing where we practiced Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday. We played Friday and Saturday, and then we collapsed Sunday and started up again on Monday. We played for three years, every single week, and we opened for all, really, the greatest bands everywhere - the European bands, the American bands. We opened for Jimi Hendrix in front of 75,000 people. We opened at Stanford University for Janis Joplin. Um, the list goes on and on, and it was in fact the most magical and electrifying three years of my life. Ten years later, after being in Fleetwood Mac for quite a long time already by then, as I looked back on it, my memories were so strong as to what had happened that this is the song that came out of those memories. ‘So I’m back to the velvet underground’ - San Francisco. ‘Back to the floor that I loved’ - Lindsey’s and my little house. ‘Back to a room with some paper roses and some flowers’ - our bedroom. And back to the gypsies that he and I were. 

October 27, 2009. Manchester, UK

In 1965 my family was transferred from Los Angeles up to San Francisco. I was a senior in high school. Lindsey was a junior. Twelfth and eleventh grade. I met him one day and I never heard from him or saw him again. For two years. Two years later I get a phone call from a band, Lindsey’s band. And it wasn’t Lindsey on the phone. He doesn’t really like to make phone calls, not even now. Anyway - as even he will tell you - so, anyway, it was his drummer. His name was Bob and Bob said, "So, um, Stevie, I don’t know if you remember any of us or not but we have a band and we would like to know if you would like to come and be in our band." And my first question to that was, "What kind of band is it?" And they said, "Well, it’s, this is San Francisco, it’s 1968, it’s a really hard rock San Francisco band," and I’m like, "Yee-esssss! I can do it!" Two days later I am in the car driving to Lindsey’s house for practice. We practiced Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, and we played Friday and Saturday. For three years. We opened for every great band ever. All the great European bands, all the blues bands, all the great American bands, Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin. We got to stand on the side of the stage and watch all these bands, which was where you hone your craft. And that’s why, when Lindsey and I joined Fleetwood Mac, we were actually able to walk in and not be so terrified that we couldn’t even do it. So ten years later, looking back on this electrifying three years, I wrote this next song cos I wanted to have a memory of this and if you don’t write it down, you will not have a memory. So the memory was ‘So I’m back to the velvet underground’ - San Francisco. ‘Back to the floor that I loved’ - our little house. ‘Back to a room with some lace and paper flowers’ - that was our bedroom. And back to the gypsies that we were. 

October 30th, 2009. London, UK

… I met him one day, and then I never heard from or saw him again in two years. Two years later I got a call from his band that he has formed and that has been playing all over San Francisco. They said, um, ‘Do you want to, would you like to join our band?’ And my reaction to that was, you know, "Okay, well, what kind of band is it?" He said, "Well, it’s San Francisco. It’s 1968. It’s a hard rock San Francisco band." I’m like, "Ye-sssssss!" I’m secretly thrilled. I say, "Yes, I can do that." And so the next day I am driving to Lindsey’s house for practice. We practiced Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday. We played Friday and Saturday. For three years. We opened for all of your great bands. We opened for all of our great bands. We opened for bands that weren’t even that great but that we thought were pretty great. The great thing is is that when you’re opening for a show that has eight bands on it, you get to stand on the side of the stage and you get to watch Jimi Hendrix, you get to watch Janis Joplin. Therefore, Lindsey and I honed our craft so that when we walked into Fleetwood Mac we were not just completely terrified. It was the most electric three years of my life, and almost ten years later when I looked back on it, I wanted to put it into a song that wasn’t cheesy and that was, that would capture my memories. ‘So I’m back to the velvet underground’ - San Francisco. ‘Back to the floor that I loved’ - Lindsey’s and my little house. ‘Back to a room with some lace and paper flowers’ - our bedroom. And back to the gypsies that we were. 

December 1, 2009. Melbourne, Australia

In 1965 my family was transferred from Los Angeles up to San Francisco, California. I was a senior - twelfth grade - and Lindsey was a junior - eleventh grade. I met him one day, one afternoon, I dunno, one early evening, and I never saw him again for two years. Um, I got a phone call and it was a band that he had formed, he and his friends had formed probably, right after he graduated. And, uh, they asked me if I wanted to join their band, and I’m really a little folk singer at this point. And I said, "So what kind of band is it?" And, uh, Bob the drummer said, "Well, it’s San Francisco, Stevie, it’s a really, it’s a hard ass rock ’n’ roll band." And I’m like, "Excuse me for a moment. Yesssss! I think I can do that!" Next thing I know I am catapulted into, really, the best time of my life.  For the next three years we played every single weekend. We practiced Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday. We played Friday and Saturday. Sometimes we played Sunday. I went to San Jose State. They did not. So I studied, sorta. Mostly we were in a band. We opened for every big act that there was, really - all the European acts, all the American acts, and acts we’d never even heard of but great acts. We opened for Jimi Hendrix in front of 75,000 people. We opened for Janis Joplin in front of 30,000 people at Stanford Frost Amphitheater. It was such an amazing - It was as amazing as if you wanted to be a rock star and you would think this, this is exactly what it was. This was pre-Fleetwood Mac and it was still so electric that Lindsey and I were just knocked off our feet. And so anyway, ten years ago, ten years later, I wanted to put this down in some kind of verse and song so that I could remember it. And so what happened was it came out to be this: ‘So I’m back to the velvet underground’ - San Francisco. ‘Back to the floor’ - no furniture - ‘that I loved’ - Lindsey’s and my house. ‘Back to a room with some roses and some paper flowers’ - our bedroom. Back to the gypsies that we were. 

December 7th, 2009. Sydney, Australia

In 1965 my family got transferred from Los Angeles up to San Francisco. I was a senior in high school; Lindsey was a junior in high school. Which means twelfth grade and eleventh grade. I met him one day and then I never saw him again for two years. I got a phone call from his drummer. They had formed a band over that two years - and so his drummer called - Lindsey still doesn’t like to make phone calls. He had the drummer call me. "So Stevie, would you like to join our band? (?) and we were wondering if you would like to come and sing in our band?" And I’m like, "Cool, what kind of band is it?" And, you know, I’m a folk singer. And he said, "Well, it’s a hard rock ’n’ roll San Francisco band." And I’m like, "Excuse me just a minute. Yessssss! I think I can do that." Two days later I’m on my way to Lindsey’s house - unbeknownst to us, we live in the same gated community - and I’m driving to Lindsey’s on Monday afternoon. 5.30 for practice. Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday. We played on Friday and Saturday, and we practiced again on Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday. We did this for three years. We opened for all the great European bands, all the great American bands, and I’m sure there were some great Australian bands in there somewhere. And this was for three years. So this was really where he and I honed our craft at being able to walk out onstage in front of a lot of people. When you’re opening for a group, for a show that has eight bands - and you’re the first band -, you’re the first band but what you get to do is you get to stand at the side of the stage and you get to watch the last band. And that’s really where we learned what we do. So ten years later, after joining Fleetwood Mac, I really wanted to put those three years down into a song or into a poem, something that would make something for him and I to remember what we did. And who we were. So that poem ended up to be this. ‘So I’m back to the velvet underground’ - San Francisco. ‘Back to the floor that I loved’ - our furniture-less house. ‘Back to a room with some lace and paper flowers’ - our bedroom. Back to the gypsies that he and I were.