Stevie: Well, this is my moment in the set where I get to tell a story that - Well, it started out the first night in, um, Columbus, Ohio, it was 5 to 7 minutes, something like that. By the time we got to 62nd show, it was like 15 minutes. So every time I try to make it shorter, it just gets longer, which is, of course, what always happens with really good stories cos you remember all the stuff that really happened and not just the things but the little things around the story. So Lindsey gallantly has told me that he finds it charming that I actually tell this story, so I try not to feel bad about spending so much time telling this story. But here it is. So in 1970, Lindsey and I were living in the middle of the most amazing music time - I think - in the world. It was San Francisco, it was 1966, ’67, ’68, ’69, ’70. It was Jimi Hendrix, it was Janis Joplin. It was the best you could imagine. Lindsey and I were right in the moment. We, um - I joined his band in 1968. We played for 1968, ’69, ’70 every weekend. Practiced every day. I went to college; they didn’t. They didn’t care. I tried to study. I did okay; I got Cs. My parents supported me. And I got to keep the money I made in the band, which was actually pretty darn good because we were opening for Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin, all the San Francisco bands. It was awesome!

So sometime around that time I wrote - Well, I should tell you that Lindsey and I then at the end of 1968, ’69, ’70 started going out, so - And we were like this really cute couple and, um, we were making this amazing music. And I wrote this poem about him, really. Um, I figure a little into it, into it a little, but it’s mostly just about him, and how I felt about him when I first met him. Because, you know, your first impressions are always important, and I found him to be so sexy and so handsome and so nice and so very, very talented. What’re you gonna do? *laughs* So, anyway, I wrote this poem. So years go by. We get to 1973, almost 1973, and we do ‘Buckingham Nicks’. And we think we’ve made the best record that could ever be made in life and, um, I have written this song, this great song, that, with this poem. Somehow it didn’t make it on the Buckingham Nicks album. The Buckingham Nicks album came out, got dropped by Polydor Records, and then this song surfaced again cos we had made a really, really good demo of it. And, um, so there it was, we had it and we were probably going to record it for our second Buckingham Nicks album but it disappeared again. And we think that one of our friends - I say friends loosely - um, stole our tape and off it went into the cosmos never to be seen or heard of again.

Until 2010. So in 2010, my friends who, some of them are on the internet, all of them really. Except for me. And they came and they said, "God, this is a great song! Look at this! And it’s like a video and everything. There’s pictures of you and Lindsey. It’s all really sweet." And I look at this song and I’m like, "Wow, that’s the song." And I take it to Lindsey. At this point we’re making a little EP for this tour. I said, "Do you remember this song?" He said, "Well, yeah, I’m playing on it and I did a great arrangement on it, did I not?" And I’m saying, "Yes! So let’s record it. Let’s Fleetwood Mac record it." He goes, "Okay." So we went into his studio at his house and we recorded it. And we tried - I know, how long now? If I had a watch, I’d tell you. And we recorded it and we recorded it almost exactly the way that we had recorded it in probably the beginning of 1973. We stayed very loyal to what it was.

So I think it is one of the - It is a moment - If you notice, when we sing this and of course I’ll screw it up because I’ve said this, we know this song so well that it’s just ingrained in our heads, you know, and we don’t have to worry about forgetting the words. Until tonight. Um, and it shows kind of who we were in, a long time ago, and we all kind of wish that, we wish you could’ve been with us at that point. Because there really was nothing like it; it was just magical. So the song is called ‘Without You’. It is very similar to how it was and, um, that’s my story. Is there anything you want to say? Is there anything you’d like to add to that?

Lindsey: Me?

Stevie: On the 63rd show?

Lindsey: Um, well, yes. Um, no, well just that - Uh oh. You’re turning your mic around. Should I - 

Stevie: As Katy would say, "I’m coming at ya like a dark horse." I don’t know where that came from, just out of the- You know, she’s here.

Lindsey: You’re gonna hear me roar.

Stevie: You’re gonna hear ME roar. Lindsey loves that song ‘Roar’. He loves it. 

Lindsey: I love that song. Love it. The record-making part of it, everything about it.

Stevie: Everything about it.

Lindsey: We shouldn’t be talking about that up here.

Stevie: But we are because we can.

Lindsey: That’s true. We can do any damn thing we want up here, right? We’re slowly turning into something like the Rat Pack up here.

Stevie: We are. Or George Burns and Gracie Allen. 

Lindsey: That’s probably better, yeah. 

Stevie: Okay. 

Lindsey: No, just, you know, this has been a very - I think we’ve, musically we’ve played about as good as we’ve ever played on this tour. We’ve had, it’s been a challenging tour for a lot of reasons and yet, as we come to the end of it, I’m so glad that we’ve done it. And, uh, as I was saying before, there are a few more chapters left in the book of Fleetwood Mac. And I love you, Stevie. I love you.

Stevie: I love you, too. Thank you. 

Lindsey: Where do -

Stevie: Let’s go home.
Lindsey: - we go from there?

Lindsey: Well, goodnight! 

Stevie: So here it is, the song.

Lindsey: Okay.

Stevie: ‘Without You.’

Lindsey: Good.